Identify Old Apps that Won’t Work with iOS 11

32-bit-photo

If you’ve been using an iPhone or iPad for more than a few years, it’s possible that some of your apps won’t even launch in iOS 11. Here’s what’s going to happen, and what you can do about it.

Apple used 32-bit processors through the iPhone 5, fourth-generation iPad, original iPad mini, and fifth-generation iPod touch. In 2013, Apple began putting 64-bit chips in all new iOS devices. Apple encouraged developers to make their apps run in 64-bit mode for the new iOS devices, but kept iOS 7 compatible with older 32-bit apps. Then in 2015, Apple required apps to run in 64-bit mode to receive App Store approval. If you open a 32-bit app and you are running iOS 10, your iPhone or iPad warns you that the app might slow down your device and later said that 32-bit apps would need to be updated.

32-bit-warnings

So that’s the history. Now what? First off, don’t worry about what 32-bit and 64-bit mean — all you need to know is that 32-bit apps are old and won’t run in iOS 11, and that 64-bit apps will continue to work as they always have.

How do you know which of your apps are 32-bit? For apps that you use regularly, you’ve probably seen one of those warnings. But what about other apps that you open only occasionally — how can you figure out which of those will not work in iOS 11?

In iOS 10.3, Apple added a feature to call out these 32-bit apps. All you need to do is open the Settings app. Now go to > General > About > Applications to see a list of 32-bit apps that don’t have direct updates available (if Applications isn’t tappable, either you still need to upgrade your device to iOS 10.3 or your device doesn’t contain any 32-bit apps). Tap an app in the list to load it in the App Store, where you may be able to find more info or a support link for the developer. Unfortunately, many old apps aren’t in the App Store anymore.

32-bit-App-Compatibility

Now that you know which of your apps won’t survive the transition to iOS 11, what should you do? You have a few options:

  • Delete the app. If you haven’t used an app in years, or don’t remember what it does, there’s no reason to keep it around. To get delete it, go back to your Home screen, press and hold on any app icon until all the icons start to wiggle, now tap the X badge on the app icon you want to delete. When you are finished deleting your apps, press the Home button to stop the wiggling.
  • Look for an update that’s a new app. Because Apple doesn’t let developers charge for updates, many developers have been forced to make their updates into new apps so they can afford future development. To see if this has happened, search in the App Store for the app and see if a new version appears. Or look for information on the company’s Web site.
  • You can look for an alternative app. Few iOS apps are truly unique, so you may be able to find an alternative app that does basically the same thing as the oder app.
  • Don’t upgrade to iOS 11. Or, at least, don’t upgrade right away. In general, you should stay up to date with new versions of iOS to ensure that you’re protected from security vulnerabilities that Apple has discovered and patched. But there’s no harm in delaying an upgrade for a little while as you wait for an app to be updated or look for an alternative. You may want to contact the developer of the app to see if an update is being developed. They may be able to recommend a replacement app as well.
  • You can also stick with an older device. If you have an extra iOS device that can’t run iOS 11 anyway, keep the app on that device. This approach may not work for an app you need on your primary iPhone, for instance, but it would for an old game that you could play on an elderly iPad 2.

Take a few minutes now so you won’t be surprised if one or more of your favorite apps can’t make the transition to iOS 11 when it ships in a few months!