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AutoFill and Other Forms

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you can see which websites hold data used in other forms and how you can remove that data being saved for AutoFill.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to see which websites Safari has saved information from other forms.
  • • How you can delete a website and the information it has saved from filling out other forms used with AutoFill.

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To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Having Safari suggest a Strong Password

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you can have Safari suggest a strong password when you create an account or change the password on an existing account for a membership website.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to have Safari suggest a strong password when creating a password or updating a password for a website.
  • • How to bypass Safari’s strong password suggestion and use your own password when logging into a site or changing the password on a site.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Using AutoFill for Usernames and Passwords

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you use AutoFill to save and enter your saved usernames and password for sites that require you to log in.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to have Safari save your username and password when logging into a Website.
  • • How to have Safari never save your username and password when logging into a Website.
  • • How to log into a website using a saved username and password.
  • • How to have Safari remembers an updated username or password when logging into a website.
  • • See all the websites that have usernames and passwords saved.
  • • Look up a password for a website.
  • • See if the same password is being used on multiple websites.
  • • Share a password using AirDrop.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Using AutoFill with Credit Cards

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you use AutoFill to save your credit cards and then have Safari autofill a credit card form when purchasing online.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to enter your credit card information into Safari so AutoFill can automatically fill out a credit card when needed.
  • • How to have Safari fill out a credit card form when purchasing online.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Using AutoFill with your Contact Information

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you use AutoFill to fill out forms in Safari using your contact card in the Contacts app.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to set your contact card as the contact Safari uses with AutoFill.
  • • How to see which contact card AutoFill is currently using.
  • • How to use your contact information to fill out a form in Safari.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Minimizing Risk when using AutoFill

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at how you can minimize the risk of someone using your AutoFill information including usernames and passwords, and credit card information.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • Why and how you change the password on your Mac to prevent people from walking up to your Mac and using AutoFill to log into a website.
  • • How you can require your Mac to need a password when unlocking after going to sleep.
  • • How you can change the length of time before your Mac requires a password to unlock it once it goes to sleep.
  • • How you can set the time before your Mac goes to sleep.
  • • Different ways you can lock your Mac before you walk away including using Lock under the Apple Menu and using Hot Corners to lock your Mac.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

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Enabling Autofill and iCloud Keychain

In this lesson for using Tutor for using AutoFill with Forms and Passwords in Safari on the Mac, I look at what AutoFill is and how you enable the different features for using AutoFill in forms in Safari on the Mac.

What you’ll learn in this lesson:

  • • How to enable and how AutoFill can fill in forms using your information from your Contact Card.
  • • How to enable and how AutoFill can fill in login forms automatically using saved usernames and passwords.
  • • How to enable and how AutoFill can fill out credit card information when purchasing online.
  • • How to enable and how AutoFill works with other forms.
  • • How to enable and how AutoFill works with iCloud Keychain so you can share your AutoFill information with your other Apple devices such as an iPhone or iPad.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

Getting Around your Mac

In this lesson for macOS Mojave, I introduce you to various ways you get around the Mac. This includes an introduction to the Finder, Finder Window, Desktop and Desktop Folder, Menu Bar, and Dock. These are more of an introduction on these features just to get you acquainted, throughout the tutorial I have more in-depth coverage of these features and more.

Introduction to the Finder
The Finder is how you get around your Mac. The finder controls all the windows you use to view and work with your files and folders. It is an app that is always running on your mac, and you can always find it on the far left of the Dock.

Introduction to a Finder Window
A Finder Window is how you view and work with your files and folders on your Mac. Think of it as a window into your hard drive. If you do not have any windows open, you can click on the Finder on the Dock, this will open a new Finder Window showing you all your recent files by default.

Introduction to the Desktop
The Desktop is what you see when you do not have windows open. This is where your desktop picture is shown, or wallpaper if you are coming from Windows. On the right side of the display, you will find all your files and folders that are stored on your Desktop. You will also see any external hard drives that are connected to your Mac.

Introduction to the Desktop Folder
You can also access all your files and folders that are located on your Desktop through your Desktop Folder. The Desktop is just another folder on the Mac. If you make a change to a file on the Desktop, that same change will be applied to the file shown in the Desktop Folder, as it is the same file.

Introduction to the Menu Bar
The Menu bar on a Mac is always located at the top of your display. It will show the active app on the left side, with all the menu items for that app. If you click on the Desktop, it shows the Finder app as the Desktop is part of the Finder.

Introduction to the Dock
The Dock is located at the bottom of your display by default. The Dock is divided into three sections in macOS Mojave. On the left are your favorite apps, to the right of those are your recent apps and open apps that are not a favorite, and to the right of your recent apps are your favorite files and folders as well as your trash.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

A closer look at Menu Bar Extras

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at Menu Extras. Menu Extras are on the right side of your Menu Bar and give you access to extra features for the macOS and specific apps. It gives you access to features without having to have the app in the front, unlike Application Menus.

Menu Extra Location
Menu Extra’s are located on the right side of your menu bar and are always shown no matter which application you are currently working in. If you are in Pages and want to start recording a video with Screenflow, you can select the Screenflow Menu Extra and start recording, without having to have Screenflow be the frontmost app.

Menu Extra Features
The features that a Menu Extra depends on the Menu Extra you select. The Clock Menu Extra will show you the date as well when selected, the Sound Menu Extra will show you the volume and allow you to change the volume when selected.

Accessing Addition Options in a Menu Extra
Depending on the Menu Extra, you will have more features when you hold down the Option key and selecting the Menu Extra. The Sound Menu Extra gives you access to the sound output or speaker, but when you option-click on it, it also gives you access to the microphones you have connected to your Mac. Not all Menu Extra have additional options.

Moving a Menu Extra
To move a Menu Extra, just command-click (use the command key and click on the Menu Extra). When you do this, you can drag it around to move it. You can only move it to another location on the right side of your Menu Bar.

Removing a Menu Extra
To remove a Menu Extra, just Command-click on the Menu Extra you want to remove, then drag it off the Menu Bar. When you do this, it will be removed from your Menu Bar.

Adding Menu Extras
Menu Extras for macOS can be found in the preference panes of the System Preferences. The Sound Menu Extra is found int he Sound Preference Pane, the Display Menu Extra is located in the Displays Preference Pane. Not all Preference Panes have Menu Extras.

An applications Menu Extra is usually found in the app’s preferences, which is located under the Application name in the Menu Bar. If the app supports a Menu Extra, you can turn it on and off in the application preferences.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

Accessing Folders and Navigating Folders

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at how you can access various folders including your Documents folder or Download folder, as well as how to navigate folders on the Mac.

Accessing Folders from the Menu Bar
You can easily access a number of folders the Mac uses including the Applications folder, Documents folder, Downloads folder, and more. To see and select which one of the folders you want to ope, go the ‘Go’ menu in the Menu Bar. You do have to be in the FInder to see this menu. Once you click on ‘Go,’ you’ll see all the folders you have access too from this menu. Just select the folder you want to open top open it in the Finder.

Accessing Folders from the Sidebar in a WIndow
When you have a Finder window open, on the left of the window is a sidebar. In this sidebar will be a number of folders. Just select the folder you want to open, and your window will open to that folder.

Opening Folders
When you are looking at your folders in a Finder window, you just double click on it to open it. When looking at your folders in list view, you can also click on the triangle to the left of the folder name to open the folder. In column view, when you select a folder, the contents of that folder will be shown in the next column.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

Using the Secondary Menu

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at the Secondary Menu. With the Secondary menu, you have access to common tools such as copy, paste, as well as specific features for an app.

Accessing the Secondary Menu
There are a few ways to access the Secondary Menu on the Mac.

  • Control-Click: If you hold down the Control key and click, you’ll see the menu pop up under your cursor. Just select the menu option you want to use when it pops up.
  • Two-finger tap with a Trackpad: If you have a trackpad, you can tap the trackpad with two fingers, when you do this, the menu will pop up under your cursor.
  • Mouse: If you want to access the Secondary Menu with a mouse, you need to open your System Preferences and select the Mouse Preference Pane. From there, you can choose which button you want to use for the Secondary Click.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

Working with Finder Windows

In this lesson for macOS Mojave, I look at how you work with Finder Windows on the Mac. Finder windows are how you explore your Mac, as well as organize all your files and folders. It’s a crucial part of working with your Mac.

Opening a Finder Window
If you do not have any Finder windows open, when you click on the Finder in the Dock, a new Finder window will open. If there are already windows open, it will bring one of them forward. If you want to create a new Finder window, you go up to File in the Menu Bar and select New Finder Window.

Anatomy of a Window
A Finder window comprises of a sidebar on the left. This sidebar gives you quick access to various folders, iCloud Drive, different network locations, and tags. We look at these various items in detail throughout the tutorial including how you can customize the sidebar. But for now, just think of it as an easy way to get to various folders.

A Finder window also has a Toolbar. This is located across the top of the window and gives you quick access to various tools including different ways to view your files and folders, access to tasks, and more. This is also where you click-and-drag to move a window.

Resizing a Window
Finder windows are easily resizable. To resize a window, just drag any one of the edges or corners of the window you want to resize. When you get to the edge, you will see the cursor change into an arrow. Once it changes, you click-and-drag to resize the window.

Opening Multiple Windows
You can open multiple Finder windows. Just go to File in the Menu Bar and select ‘New Finder Window.’ When you do this, a new window will open. You can click on any folder in the sidebar to open that specific window to that folder or location. The frontmost window will have a slightly darker toolbar and the dots to close, minimize, and open in full-screen will have color. These dots are located in the upper left corner of the window.

Closing, Minimizing and opening a Window in Full-Screen
To close, minimize, or open a window in full-screen, you click on one of the three dots in the upper left corner of a window.

  • Red Dot – the red dot closes the window.
  • Yellow Dot – the yellow dot minimizes the window. When you minimize it, it moves the window to the Dock. Once it’s in the dock, you can click on it to ‘open’ it again.
  • Green Dot – The green dot opens the window in full screen. Once it is in full screen, it is no longer a ‘window.’ Also, you will see the Menu Bar and Dock hide. To show them again, just bring your cursor to the top or bottom of your display. To bring it back to a standard window, move your cursor to the top right of your display and click on the green dot again.

Selecting a Window
If you have multiple windows open, you can select any one of them by clicking on the window. When you do this, it brings it to the front. You can also go to Windows in the Menu Bar and select the window you want to bring forward.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

A closer look at Application Menus

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at Application Menus. Application menus not only tell you which app you are currently in but they also give you access to specific features for the active app.

Seeing which App is the active App
If you ever want to see which is the active app, the app that is frontmost, just look at the left side of the Menu Bar. The application name will show you which app is front most. Also, you will see menu items specific to that app.

Accessing App Specific Menu
Just go to the right of the Application name to see specific menus for that app. A few of these menus are consistent across multiple apps, including File and Edit, but under each menu name, they will have specific features for the app.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

A look at the Folder Hierarchy of the Mac

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at the folder hierarchy of macOS Mojave. The better you understand how your Mac is organized, the easier it will be to keep it organized with your files and folders.

Folder Structure
macOS is installed the Macintosh HD by default. This is the hard drive that is on your computer. Think of this hard drive as a filing cabinet. When you open Macintosh HD, you’ll see 4 folders, think of these for folders as drawers in your filing cabinet. These four folders are:

  • Applications: This is where all your applications are stored. If you install a new application, it will be installed in this folder. Nothing else should be stored in this folder.
  • Library and System: These next two folders are used by macOS and should not be touched.
  • Users: This last folder contains all the user files and folders including your documents and downloads. Your computer can have multiple users, so when you open the Users folder, you will see all your users. In most cases, it will just be a single user. When you open the users’ folder, you will see the documents, downloads, music, movies, and other folders. This is where all the users’ files and folders are stored.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.

Tutor for macOS Mojave

A closer look at the Apple Menu

In this lesson for macOS Mojave on the Mac, I look at the Apple Menu and the different options we have in the Apple Menu.

Location of the Apple Menu
The Apple Menu is always located in the upper left corner of your display and is always available. It does not matter which app you are in, you will always have access to the Apple Menu.

Apple Menu Features
The Apple menu gives you access to various features of the Mac, and as I stated above, these are always available to you.

  • About this Mac: This will open a window showing you various information about your Mac including which macOS you are using, the serial number, storage options, and support options.
  • System Preferences: This opens the System Preferences, which is where you can set the default behavior of your Mac.
  • Mac App Store: This will open the Mac App Store app.
  • Recent Items: This will show you your recent apps that you’ve opened and recent documents you’ve opened. You can select any one of them to open them again.
  • Force Quit: Select this to open a window showing all your open apps. From there you can select any one of the apps and force quit them. When you force quit them, the app does not save any changes.
  • Sleep: Select this to put your Mac to sleep.
  • Restart: This will restart your computer.
  • Shutdown: This will shut down your Mac.
  • Lock Screen: This will lock your screen. When you select this, to unlock the screen again, you’ll need to enter your Mac password.
  • Logout: This will log the mac out of the current user. When you select this, you will be brought to a screen where all your users are lists, and you can choose the user account you want to open.

See this Lesson Action
To see this lesson in action, take a look at the video above.